Books and Movies Reviews

Barn Burning

In William Faulkner’s “Barn Burning”, a young boy must face his father.He must also discover for himself that his father is wrong and learn to grow up the right way.Faulkner’s setting is one of the most important literary elements in the story.He takes a young boy and puts him in a real world of chaos and disorder.In the South, race is one of the most important factors in how one would live his or her life.The only way he can retain his own dignity in the end is to believe in his own courage and goodwill.
The young boy, Sartoris, has a kind of loyalty for his father, Abner Snopes.He admires him and everything he does.He believes that his father is always right.In the beginning of the story, Sartoris is faced with hisfirst major conflict.He is in the court room as a witness to a barn burning.Thejudge can only pardon Abner because Sarty is too young and can not be used as the key witness, but the judge tells them they must leave the country for their own safety and the safety of others. All the while Sarty thinks to himself how he must not talk to authority.”Our enemy… ourn!mine and his both! He’s my father!” (77).He sees the men in the courthouse as the enemy, even the judge.
After they leave the country, Abner gets into troubleagain.This time Sarty stays loyal to himself instead of his father.He warns a man named Major de Spain about his barn burning.Sarty has now changed because he thought on his own.When he realizes that some of the things his father does is wrong, he decides to run off and be on his own because he does not want to live that way anymore.Sarty has moved out of childhood, developing a mind and will of his own.He is no longer unperceptively loyal to his father.Sarty becomes his own self-reliant person, instead of being the shadow of his father.When he warns de Spain of his barn burning, Sarty becomes disloyal to his father and his own heritage.
After they flee…