Books and Movies Reviews

Immigration, Hester Street

From the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean, our country is a nation of immigrants. We have heard this in many presidential speeches and are constantly reminded of such. Look about and you will see people, faces that were born in a different place or are descendant of people born elsewhere.From New York to California, our country illustrates, with every human encounter, a nation of diversity, blend, and economic expansion.The strength of character this county has, in which tall skyscrapers were constructed, was build with the hands and manual labor that can trace to heritage miles across oceans.We are a country that has reached successes with a diversity of a nation who exemplified the American Dream.
The late nineteenth century and early twentieth century were incredibly significant with regard to immigration in our American history.This precise time in our history is distinguished by one of the prevalent sources of immigrants, in any era, where the majority arrived from countries Southern and Eastern Europe (Italy, Poland, Russia, and the Balkans). The families and individuals that arrived at our ports, principally Ellis Island, were predominantly a peasant people. They were refugees fleeing political and religious persecution. They sort after the American Vision.
The movie Hester Street (Director: Joan Micklin Silver) captures the very fundamental nature of immigrants and their enormous effort, together with their ambitions, to live the American Dream and absorb their new environment; their new home.The Polish-Jewish immigrates, depicted in Hester Street, and was one of the most influential people in the streets of New York at the turn of the century. Hester Street, the movie, takes the view throughout the early years of the Garment District. This film identifies with the turn of the century labor, segregation, poverty and many additional issues confronted by the movies immigrates.