Books and Movies Reviews

kids

I have to admit, whenfirst told of our out of class assignment to work with the kids from Cambridge; I thought it was just something to do in my spare time.I figured I could spare enough time to get to know the kids while participating in outside activities.However, now with the "required" time we have to spend over at Cambridge almost finished, I find myself thinking that I would like to continue to work with and visit the children even after our time is up. As President Roosevelt said once, "Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” I have seen these kids progress tremendously since thefirst day of my involvement, and I cannot help but feel that I had a little to do with it.I am willing to spend a little more of my spare time, if that means that at least one kid turns out to be a better person because of it.It is then that I will feel truly satisfied with my involvement with the kids from Cambridge.
How do poor parents cope? Many poor families cut back on food, which interferes with kids’ development and can create health problems for everyone in the house hold. Many rent substandard housing, do without health insurance, and are forced to settle for poor quality child care. Poverty is tough on children. When it’s cold in the house and there’s not much to eat, kids get sick more often and can do worse in school. This affects their long-term health and future job prospects. Family stress increases and so can emotional and physical abuse. When parents work and still can’t pay for their family’s basic needs, society is saying to children: it doesn’t make sense to play by the rules. This is not a good message for kids to grow up with. This is the world these kids at Cambridge live with. I do not know what it is about these kids that make them different from other children I have worked with.Perhaps it is their circumstances. Love is a state…