Books and Movies Reviews

Love Death Hate Life

Through the film, The Bride of Frankenstein, the Pygmalion myth is revised and also, abused.It is almost a complete revision of the original Pygmalion myth, in regards to the idea that, the film, The Bride of Frankenstein, is actually a continuation of Galatea's point of view after creation, with Galatea being represented by the Frankenstein Monster.The film follows the characters through their struggles, fears, and desires. Desire is the key component to the endlessly troublesome events that take place in the film.
To create Frankenstein, the body parts of deceased humans were stolen from their graves and tombs to later be sown together to create the monster. Dr. Frankenstein wanted to create life not through normal reproduction, but through scientific experimentation.Once the body parts were sown together, Dr. Frankenstein ran bolts of electricity through the body to instill life into his newly formed creature.The experiment proved a success until Frankenstein's creature realized his physical strength (and therefore, power over others), and sought independence from the Doctor (only afterfirst attempting to kill him by way of the windmill).Frankenstein's only desire was to be accepted by human beings; He wished to be treated and acknowledged as an equal.
The Pygmalion myth takes place in ancient Greece where Pygmalion was a creative sculptor and beloved king.Creating the woman of his desires is his ultimate goal. After his statue is virtually finished, Pygmalion prays to Venus to bring his ivory figure to life. Frankenstein's creator, Dr. Frankenstein, portrays Pygmalion.Pygmalion was a highly regarded king in his era. Like Pygmalion, Dr. Frankenstein possesses a rather high position in society. He achieved this stature through his impressive inventions.Both Pygmalion and Dr. Frankenstein are loathed by their creations. Frankenstein is created in Dr. Frankenstein's lab in Gene…