Books and Movies Reviews

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby portrays 1920's life.The novel's author, F. Scott Fitzgerald, describes the lives of the upper-class segment of society, a group of which Fitzgerald possessesfirst-hand knowledge.Although they lead glamorous and seemingly carefree lifestyles, the characters in the novel possess many glaring moral deficiencies and personal insecurities.They endlessly seek personal advancement and overall happiness by any means necessary, yet in the end, they fall short of true happiness.Throughout the novel, moral decadence, frequent exploitation, and the unobtainable American Dream represent significant themes in understanding various interpretations of The Great Gatsby's storyline.
Throughout the novel, moral decadence is displayed by many members of the wealthy, ruthless upper-class society.For example, blatant adultery takes place throughout the novel.Tom Buchannan and Myrtle Wilson, both of whom have marriages with other people, arrange a meeting together in New York (Fitzgerald 30-31).Both Tom and Myrtle treat their spouses as their inferiors, and neither really respects his or her marriage at all.According to Kate Maurer, Tom openly participates in the affair with Myrtle.His wife Daisy has come to accept it, however (78).Tom clearly does not respect or acknowledge his marriage to Daisy.Later in the novel, Daisy Buchannan admits to Tom that she no longer loves him, and that she now loves Gatsby.Daisy shows a great lack of moral character when she quickly involves herself in an affair with Gatsby.Gatsby's willingness to go after another man's wife shows a disregard for the marriage on his part.Marriage stands as one of the oldest, most widely-recognized institutions of society, symbolizing a life-long bond of devotion.When one purposely intrudes on or withdraws from this bond, he or she shows a great deal of disregard, not only for his or her partner, but also for the laws…

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