Fever Pitch

Nick Hornby has been a soccer fan since the moment he was conceived. Fever Pitch is his tribute to a lifelong obsession. Part autobiography, part comedy, part incisive analysis of insanity, Hornby’s award-winning memoir captures the fever pitch of fandom—its agony and ecstasy, its community, its defining role in thousands of young men’s coming of age stories. Fever Pitch is one for the home team. But above all, it is one for everyone who knows what it really means to have a losing season.

In the States, Nick Hornby is best know as the author of High Fidelity and About a Boy, two wickedly funny novels about being thirtysomething and going nowhere fast. In Britain he is revered for his status as a fanatical football writer (sorry, fanatical soccer writer), owing to Fever Pitch–which is both an autobiography and a footballing Bible rolled into one. Hornby pinpoints 1968 as his formative year–the year he turned 11, the year his parents separated, and the year his father first took him to watch Arsenal play. The author quickly moved “way beyond fandom” into an extreme obsession that has dominated his life, loves, and relationships. His father had initially hoped that Saturday afternoon matches would draw the two closer together, but instead Hornby became completely besotted with the game at the expense of any conversation: “Football may have provided us with a new medium through which we could communicate, but that was not to say that we used it, or what we chose to say was necessarily positive.” Girlfriends also played second fiddle to one ball and 11 men. He fantasizes that even if a girlfriend “went into labor at an impossible moment” he would not be able to help out until after the final whistle. Fever Pitch is not a typical memoir–there are no chapters, just a series of match reports falling into three time frames (childhood, young adulthood, manhood). While watching the May 2, 1972, Reading v. Arsenal match, it became embarrassingly obvious to the then 15-year-old that his white, suburban, middle-class roots made him a wimp with no sense of identity: “Yorkshire men, Lancastrians, Scots, the Irish, blacks, the rich, the poor, even Americans and Australians have something they can sit in pubs and bars and weep about.” But a boy from Maidenhead could only dream of coming from a place with “its own tube station and West Indian community and terrible, insoluble social problems.” Fever Pitch reveals the very special intricacies of British football, which readers new to the game will find astonishing, and which Hornby presents with remarkable humor and honesty–the “unique” chants sung at matches, the cold rain-soaked terraces, giant cans of warm beer, the trains known as football specials carrying fans to and from matches in prisonlike conditions, bottles smashing on the tracks, thousands of policemen waiting in anticipation for the cargo of hooligans. The sport and one team in particular have crept into every aspect of Hornby’s life–making him see the world through Arsenal-tinted spectacles. –Naomi Gesinger

Fever Dream

At the old family manse in Louisiana, Special Agent Pendergast is putting to rest long-ignored possessions reminiscent of his wife Helen’s tragic death, only to make a stunning-and dreadful-discovery. Helen had been mauled by an unusually large and vicious lion while they were big game hunting in Africa. But now, Pendergast learns that her rifle-her only protection from the beast-had been deliberately loaded with blanks. Who could have wanted Helen dead…and why? With Lieutenant Vincent D’Agosta’s assistance, Pendergast embarks on a quest to uncover the mystery of his wife’s murder. It is a journey that sends him deep into her past where he learns much that Helen herself had wished to keep hidden. Helen Pendergast had nursed a secret obsession with the famed naturalist-painter John James Audubon, in particular a long-lost painting of his known as the Black Frame.As Pendergast probes more deeply into the riddle-the answer to which is revealed in a night of shocking violence, deep in the Louisiana bayou-he finds himself faced with an even greater question: who was the woman he married?

Felita

Felita’s parents promise she will love their new neighborhood. Only Abuelita, her grandmother, understands how much Felita will miss her old block, and her best friend Gigi. But her new neighbors taunt and tease Felita and her family because they are from Puerto Rico. First published twenty years ago, Felita’s compelling story has resonance for kids today.”An honest, realistic view of an important aspect of contemporary American life.” –The Horn Book

Feed

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. In a future where most people have computer implants in their heads to control their environment, a boy meets an unusual girl who is in serious trouble.

This brilliantly ironic satire is set in a future world where television and computers are connected directly into people’s brains when they are babies. The result is a chillingly recognizable consumer society where empty-headed kids are driven by fashion and shopping and the avid pursuit of silly entertainment–even on trips to Mars and the moon–and by constant customized murmurs in their brains of encouragement to buy, buy, buy. Anderson gives us this world through the voice of a boy who, like everyone around him, is almost completely inarticulate, whose vocabulary, in a dead-on parody of the worst teenspeak, depends heavily on three words: “like,” “thing,” and the second most common English obscenity. He’s even made this vapid kid a bit sympathetic, as a product of his society who dimly knows something is missing in his head. The details are bitterly funny–the idiotic but wildly popular sitcom called “Oh? Wow! Thing!”, the girls who have to retire to the ladies room a couple of times an evening because hairstyles have changed, the hideous lesions on everyone that are not only accepted, but turned into a fashion statement. And the ultimate awfulness is that when we finally meet the boy’s parents, they are just as inarticulate and empty-headed as he is, and their solution to their son’s problem is to buy him an expensive car. Although there is a danger that at first teens may see the idea of brain-computers as cool, ultimately they will recognize this as a fascinating novel that says something important about their world. (Ages 14 and older) –Patty Campbell

Fathom Five

The American Civil War has ground the South into the dust for ten long years thanks in large part to the Anaconda Plan: with its naval dominance, the Union’s unbeatable ironclad warships surround the entire South, slowly but surely constricting trade and isolating the Confederacy from any outside aid. Despite how long the South has been able to hold out, the end is assured. Now two Confederate Secret Service agents and an engineer will take ship with a privateer captain and brave the Union naval blockade of New Orleans, daring the wrath of the North in a desperate attempt to reach Europe where Confederate gold can buy ironclad warships – and help the South win the Civil War. But when their ship is blown off course to an uncharted island somewhere in the Caribbean, the crew must decide if the best course for their mission lies with a European shipyard, or with the island’s strange inhabitants. Whatever they choose, the course of the Civil War – and their own survival – hangs in the balance. Full Fathom Five is a lovingly researched novella of war and bravery, love and betrayal, and soul-wrenching personal choices set against the rich backdrop of the American Civil War. Inspired by themes in Shakespeare, this story of one man’s journey will remain with readers long after the final page is turned.

The American Civil War has ground the South into the dust for ten long years thanks in large part to the Anaconda Plan: with its naval dominance, the Union’s unbeatable ironclad warships surround the entire South, slowly but surely constricting trade and isolating the Confederacy from any outside aid. Despite how long the South has been able to hold out, the end is assured. Now two Confederate Secret Service agents and an engineer will take ship with a privateer captain and brave the Union naval blockade of New Orleans, daring the wrath of the North in a desperate attempt to reach Europe where Confederate gold can buy ironclad warships – and help the South win the Civil War. But when their ship is blown off course to an uncharted island somewhere in the Caribbean, the crew must decide if the best course for their mission lies with a European shipyard, or with the island’s strange inhabitants. Whatever they choose, the course of the Civil War – and their own survival – hangs in the balance. Full Fathom Five is a lovingly researched novella of war and bravery, love and betrayal, and soul-wrenching personal choices set against the rich backdrop of the American Civil War. Inspired by themes in Shakespeare, this story of one man’s journey will remain with readers long after the final page is turned.

Fathers And Daughters

In today’s increasingly complicated world, it’s often difficult for parents to connect with their daughters–and especially so for fathers. In this unique and invaluable guide, Dr. Meg Meeker, a pediatrician with more than twenty years’ experience counseling girls, reveals that a young woman’s relationship with her father is far more important than we’ve ever realized. To become a strong, confident woman, a daughter needs her father’s attention, protection, courage, and wisdom. Dr. Meeker shares the ten secrets every father needs to know in order to strengthen or rebuild bonds with his daughter and shape her life–and his own–for the better. Inside you’ll discover:• the essential virtues of strong fathers–and how to develop them • the cues daughters take from their dads on everything from self-respect to drugs, alcohol, and sex• the truth about ground rules (girls do want them, despite their protests)• the importance of becoming a hero to your daughter• the biggest mistake a dad can make–and the ramifications• the fact that girls actually depend on their dads’ guidance into adulthood• steps fathers can follow to help daughters avoid disastrous decisions and mistakes• ways in which a father’s faith–or lack thereof–will influence his daughter• essential communication strategies for different stages of a girl’s life• true stories of “prodigal daughters”–and how their fathers helped to bring them back Dads, you are far more powerful than you think–and if you follow Dr. Meeker’s advice, the rewards will be unmatched.”Reassuring and challenging . . . a helpful road map for concerned fathers [that] tackles difficult issues.”–National Review”A touching, illuminating book that will prove valuable to all of us who are fortunate enough to have been blessed with daughters.”–Michael Medved, nationally syndicated radio talk-show host, author of Right Turns”Dr. Meeker’s conclusions are timely, relevant, and often deeply moving. No one interested in what girls experience growing up in our culture today–and the impact that parents, especially fathers, have on the experience–can afford to miss reading this book.”–Armand M. Nicholi, Jr., M.D., professor of psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

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  • ISBN13: 9780345499394
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Fatelessness

At the age of 14 Georg Koves is plucked from his home in a Jewish section of Budapest and without any particular malice, placed on a train to Auschwitz. He does not understand the reason for his fate. He doesn’t particularly think of himself as Jewish. And his fellow prisoners, who decry his lack of Yiddish, keep telling him, “You are no Jew.” In the lowest circle of the Holocaust, Georg remains an outsider. The genius of Imre Kertesz’s unblinking novel lies in its refusal to mitigate the strangeness of its events, not least of which is Georg’s dogmatic insistence on making sense of what he witnesses–or pretending that what he witnesses makes sense. Haunting, evocative, and all the more horrifying for its rigorous avoidance of sentiment, Fatelessness is a masterpiece in the traditions of Primo Levi, Elie Wiesel, and Tadeusz Borowski.

Farm City

“By turns edgy, moving, and hilarious.” -Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and In Defense of Food An unforgettably charming memoir, Farm City is full of hilarious moments, fascinating farmer’s tips, and a great deal of heart. When Novella Carpenter-captivated by the idea of backyard self-sufficiency- moved to inner city Oakland and discovered a weed-choked, garbage- strewn abandoned lot next door to her house, she closed her eyes and pictured heirloom tomatoes and a chicken coop. The story of how her urban farm grew from a few chickens to one populated with turkeys, geese, rabbits, ducks, and two three-hundred-pound pigs will capture the imagination of anyone who has ever considered leaving the city behind for a more natural lifestyle.

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  • ISBN13: 9780143117285
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: BRAND NEW FROM PUBLISHER! 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Tracking provided on most orders. Buy with Confidence! Millions of books sold!

A Single Shard

Tree-ear is fascinated by the celedon ware created in the village of Ch’ulp’o. He is determined to prove himself to the master potter, Min—even if it means making a solitary journey to present Min’s work in the hope of a royal commission . . . or arriving at the royal court with nothing but a single celadon shard.